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Developing efficient genome sequencing technologies… Building a foundation for the more efficient management and use of biological resources

  • CALS Office
  • July 5, 2016
  • Hit 781
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 Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been used in various studies of plants, animals, and microorganisms, and is recognized as a core technology in genome analysis. However, while the advantage of this technology is its ability to generate large amounts of data, its weakness is that small chunks of data need to be pieced together to create complete genomic data. Now Professor  Yang, Tae-Jin’s research team at Seoul National University CALS has succeeded in overcoming the shortcomings of NGS technology and has perfected a genome sequencing technique.

 

 The technique developed by Professor Yang’s team is capable of efficiently completing the chloroplast genome and the nuclear ribosomal genes at the same time; these pieces of genomic information are the key to research on evolution and species diversity in plants. This technology efficiently processes and completes the small-scale base sequence data generated by NGS. Compared to similar existing technologies, it has been shown to be faster, more accurate, and less expensive.

 

 The research team used this technology to acquire complete sequences for the chloroplast genome and the nuclear ribosomal genes of 30 species of rice and wild rice. The results were published in the online edition of Scientific Reports, a sister journal to Nature. This technique has also been used to obtain the complete chloroplast sequence for 11 varieties of ginseng and to develop variety-specific barcoding markers. The results of that study were published in PLOS ONE.

 

 As Professor Yang explains, “The future will be an era in which the importance of resources will be more prominent. The dnaLCW technology developed in this study will improve the global status of Korean genomic analysis technologies, enhancing both international competitiveness and seed sovereignty.”

 

<Professor Yang, Tae-Jin, chief researcher>

 

Student Reporter Lee, Sang-Wook, Kim, Su-yeon, Song, Yi-re , Shin, Ye-Hyeon

 

 

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